An attempt at nuance: gender and privilege

TL;DR: experiences of gendered privilege do not determine gender, and homogenizing trans narratives is part of the double standard trans people are subject to that cis people are not and that’s not cool.

It seems so obvious to me, as a disabled person who is often actively discriminated against while passing as ablebodied, how easy it is to experience violence and a form of privilege at the same time.  Passing means that I will not face overt discrimination, but the socially imposed boundaries limiting me still exist and affect me.  I might not be deliberately left out, as I might when I use a cane, but I still can’t keep up. I often feel the same way about gender.

Divides in the trans community often fall along what it takes to be really trans, who has more privilege, and who uses the “right” language.  Often I see statements that say things like transwomen are real women and have always been real women but never how that category is inherently oppressive.  I see animosity and harassment towards people whose gender may have changed, against nonbinary people and those who do not medically transition.  All of these things boil down to a movement that refuses to acknowledge a plurality of experiences and enforces strict hierarchies of oppression. Continue reading

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Who’s trigger is it anyway?

content: Descriptions of triggers, gaslighting, and suggestions for how to label information.

Many spaces struggle with how to provide adequate information about the nature of their content in a way that is useful to people who wish to be able to enter into difficult conversations with the means to prepare.  There seems to be a great deal of confusion regarding the nature of certain words commonly used to pinpoint hurtful subjects especially within social justice spaces.
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